All posts tagged deck building

Completed Project: Noe Valley Makeover 2013

Below is a photo of a rear yard in Noe Valley.  We installed the lower deck and fences about 6 months ago and soon we’ll be going back to finish the landscaping.  Included in the project will be a patio, stone planters, water feature, spiral stairs, curved bench/pergola, lighting, plants etc.

Here you see the completed quartzite patio and masonry work.  We used a bitterroot wall rock for the short retaining wall and a natural stone veneer on the existing concrete wall to cover the unsightliness.

View from the deck.  Note the curved redwood pergola which follows the contour of the patio.

 

We also installed a spiral staircase to provide access from the upper deck to the yard.  Spiral staircases are wonderful for small spaces as is typical in San Francisco.  They take up such a small footprint.  Tamate landscape acquires their made to order custom units from Salterspiralstairs and constructs them onsite.  This unit is aluminum and powdercoated.

We installed this simple water feature .  The cascade was made by cutting a channel into basalt.  The system re-circulates via a highly efficient pump which uses very little electricity.

Project shot at night with landscape lighting.

Completed Projects: Deck & Stairs Replacement

August 20th, 2012.  This project brings us to the Ingleside district of San Francisco where Tamate Landscaping will be replacing a deck and stairs.  The client wanted building permits so our architect/engineer has been working on plans and navigating the complex bureaucracy of  The San Francisco Department of Building Inspection.  It took approximately 5 weeks from when we were hired to the start of the deck project-anybody who has tried to get a deck permit would know how amazingly quick that is.

Project Update: August 24, 2012, end of day 4, the forms for the post footings are installed and concrete poured.

This larger footing is what secures the stairs to the ground.

Stairs stringers are cut and secured to footing and deck joists.

Building a simple deck in San Francisco can become a complex project due to  San Francisco Department of Building Inspections abundant codes, requirements and restriction.  One of these requirements for this particular project is having to build a 1 hour fire wall since the deck abuts the property line.   Here you see the fire wall in construction.  Its basically a wall with 2″x4″ framing with a layer on both sides of fire resistant sheet rock and another layer of cement board.

Project Update:  August 31, 2012 Project Complete.  Final DBI inspection signed off.

Pressure Treated Lumber (PT)

Pressure treated (PT) lumber is the predominant wood material used in San Francisco landscapes where the exposure will be in a wet enviorment or when there is earth/wood contact.  Its identified by a greenish or very brown color with staple size slits on all surfaces except the ends.  PT lumber is basically a douglass fir or equivalent lumber that has been infused with preservatives.  The preservative used until 2004 for home applications was CCA or chromated copper arsenate with the arsenate component being highly toxic and a known carcinogen.  Today we use PT that has been infused with amine copper quat (ACQ) or copper azole (CA) or micronized copper quatemary (MCQ), all products without the arsenate and much safer.  Does that mean we would recommend building a raised vegetable planter out of it?  Although the manufacturer says its safe, we still would not recommend it.  But we at Tamate Landscaping do use it for the structural components of decks and fences since its the most economical and will last the longest.  Still there are some options in some applications.  For example, instead of a PT retaining wall, consider concrete.  Or for fences, consider all redwood instead of PT structural components.  These options will cost much more but they are options none the less.  Do your own research regarding these products and feel free to contact us for different options for your specific application.

 

Completed Project: Difficult Terrain in Forest Knolls

Our current project brings us to the Forest Knolls neighborhood of San Francisco. Much of the Forest Knolls neighborhood is shrouded in Eucalyptus Trees and set amongst a hilly terrain. Landscaping can be a bit challenging. Reclaiming usable square footage usually involves creating level areas by building decks and or retaining walls. Here you see the rear yard right before the project began on June 25, 2012.1

Project Update: Excavation

It was decided that for this project we would build a series of retaining walls to create level areas. The picture below shows the end of the 5th day. All foliage has been removed, existing concrete pad broken up and hauled away, and the process of carving into the hillside is underway. By the end of the excavation, we removed 40 cubic yards of material or 6 dump trucks. As is typical in San Francisco, all work is done by hand due to limited access. With this job, we were lucky in that we were able to remove debris by wheel barrel instead of the normal 5 gallon Home Depot bucket.

Project Update: Construction of Concrete Walls

Below you see the progress of the project on July 6, 2012, 9 days into the project. We salvaged the lower existing concrete wall since it was solid. Since it was not built level, we extended it with concrete. Whenever such an extension is added, its important to add steel reinforcement. Before the concrete pour, we drilled holes in the existing wall and epoxied vertical re-bar into the wall and tied horizontal re-bar on to these. In the background, you see additional walls being put up. For wall material, we decided on CMU to save on costs since all concrete work would have to be done in many stages.

 

Project Update: Hydrostatic Pressure

The walls are finished and below you see us installing a drain behind each wall.  Hydrostatic pressure occurs when the water run-off accumulates and puts added weight behind the walls.  With the weight of water at 8.3 pounds per gallon, an extended rainy season can compromise the integrity of the wall if hydrostatic pressure is not factored in.  Our drainage system consist of digging a trench behind each wall, installing a 3″ perforated drain pipe wrapped in fabric, connecting it to the municipal drain and backfilling the trench with drain rock.

At day 14 since the start of the project, the black limestone wall cap is installed, stairs stringers are cut and the concrete base for the Silver Quartzite Flagstone patio is being poured.

 

Project Update: End of the 4th week, July 20th, 2012.

Here you see the the Silver Quartzite Flagstone being mortared in over a 3-4″ concrete base.  Each piece is carefully selected and fit into place, kind of like a gist jigsaw puzzle.  Silver Quartzite is a favorite at Tamate Landscaping due to its natural characteristics: Its the hardest, most non porous of all flagstones and the colors and patterns will not fade over time.

Redwood stairs and safety rails are in, the retaining walls are being veneered with Beijing Green wall panels and planting work has begun.

 

Project Update:  July 26, 2012 Project Complete